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no indication our fighting men and women would cross into syrian territory. but the pentagon has told the obama administration it would require more than 75,000 soldiers to secure syria's chemical weapons stockpile. it's impossible to say exactly how much that would cost. but the price tag for that sort of operation could easily run into the billions of dollars. now, again, there is no indication at all that such an operation will happen any time soon. all this coming just days after president obama warned the syrian regime of consequences if it turned chemical weapons on its own citizens. and today secretary of state hillary clinton saying the world has made that perfectly clear to president bashar assad. >> we have sent an unmistakable message that this would cross a red line and those responsible would be held to account. >> activists saying at least 40,000 people have died in the antigovernment uprising that began last year. now evidence the blood shed is again seeping across another border into lebanon. gunmen loyal to the syrian regime and rebels fought it out on the streets in the northe
branches of the u.s. military. we're in constant contact with them. i've just now come from the pentagon as you are aware our minister of defense ehud barak received the highest civil honor given by the secretary of defense to any civilian, the distinguished civil service medal. and i think that stands as a symbol of the deep and multifaceted relations between our two militaries. >> we're out of time. you're a historian. he just said ehud barack, that u.s.-israeli military relations have never been better. you agree? >> i agree. >> thanks for coming in. >> thank you, wolf. >>> in the wake of the scandal surrounding general david petraeus's affair and the investigations into several other high profile generals, does the u.s. military need an ethics boot camp? and more than a decade after a deadly crash, a u.s. airline gets its day in court. many of my patients clean their dentures with toothpaste. i tell them dentures are very different to real teeth. they're about 10 times softer and may have surface pores where bacteria can grow and multiply. polident is specifically designed to clean d
troops. backed by the aclu, four women service members are suing the pentagon for barring them from direct combat duty. zoey is a captain in the u.s. marine corps reserves and plaintiff in the lawsuit, air yell la is a senior staff attorney for the aclu women rights project. thanks so much. captain bodell, you deployed twice to afghanistan and basically left the active duty marines corps because you were blocked from the combat duty. what is the difference, the most important difference, between being able to be in combat and not? >> well, to be clear, women are serving in combat and i was in charge of a team called the female gaugement team -- engagement team and i had 47 marines and they were in combat if that unit was attacked, they were attacked with them. so i do want to make clear women are in combat and we're asking that the policy be changed to reflect the reality of what's happening on the ground. >> i mean -- >> exactly. the point you're making is that in these wars, there's to front line, there's no rear guard. once you've deployed you are in combat, you are subject to al
, but the pentagon, the joint chiefs, a lot of republican defense hawks, a lot of the defense contractors say not only would the level of cuts in the automatic sequester portion that goes to defense be harmful to national security, but that it would be a huge hit on the economy because there's so many jobs involved. so my sense is people don't want to talk about that because it would raise a lot of alarms but in some ways is more serious than the tax cuts even though they don't all occur at once. it would sends us down a difficult path. it's already created a lot of uncertainty in the defense world. >> some of the more liberal opponents of the deal on the democratic left, would not mind seeing these defense cuts. >> just as they wouldn't mind in some cases on the left seeing the tax increase on everybody so that they can force a vote to lower the rates back only for those americans outside the top 2%, you're right. a lot of liberals would like to see that. this is why the president has leverage. he has some leverage off of his victory in the campaign, but he's got a lot of leverage off of the
action. now, depending -- the pentagon has drawn up preliminary plans to send as many as 75,000 troops into syria to secure these chemical weapons sites, but as of just today there have been no signs that any of those forces have been put on alert or there was any detail planning to do this. so there was some question here of whether assad may be calling t president's bluff. >> rose: and what exactly do you think they would be prepared to do and what would trigger that? clearly the movement of them. but it is more or less than that? >> well, u.s. intelligence officials were watching very closely the movement of syrian forces and in also trying to divine the intentions of president assad. clearly the rebels in syria have had a very good few -- past few weeks and making advances on the capital of damascus and president assad really feels like his back may be up against the wall. but is he desperate enough now to play this card which would almost certainly draw some kind of western response. >> rose: one more time, the red line is simply moving the chemical weapons? >> well, this is inter
month there was another incident when iran claimed a drone violated airspace and the pentagon said it was fired on twice but it was not shot down and the united states maintains that drone was at all times over international waters. >>shepard: the drone of the day. thank you. a strike grounded the busiest sea port complex in all of the country. it is at a halt. that could be bad news for holiday shopping. that is because many u.s. stores rely on this port in southern california where they receive shipments of everything from clothing to furniture to tv's from...asia. hundreds of port workers walked off a week ago. the union says the managers are outsourcing the work to save money. and now to the port in long beach. adam? >>reporter: retailers are starting to be affected. it has been ongoing disagreement for 30 months culminating with how workers walking out, 10,000 long shoremen and they also will not i don't, they will honor the strike taking place by the workers which means this port is shut down. only 10 percent is getting through. this is a long beach portion. long beach and lo
expert used to work at the pentagon. now work at the american enterprise institute. thanks for coming on the show. >> thanks for having me. melissa: do you think they will be successful in this? do you think sanctions aimed at ending flow of gold into iran will really work first of all? >> sanctions itself isn't going to reverse the determination of iran to, get a nuclear weapons capability. but what we're doing is applying increasingly amounts of pressure on iran and about a year ago the senate voted 100-0 to impose banking sanctions on iran and there is very little from which we can get such bipartisan unty. what happens is iran started sending oil, sending gas to turkey in exchange for gold and so what the cop guess is doing now, again with the unanimous vote, the senate, that is, is to try to plug this last hole. if precedent is to be believed it will increase pressure a huge amount. melissa: but you know turkey wants that natural gas. that is why they're paying in gold. so i mean how realistic is it that we can actually stop them from doing this, from buying it and giving them go
with questions about unprecedented and some inappropriate access to classified information. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr spoke to the filmmakers. >> don't think she's a little young for the hard stuff? >> washington says she's a killer. >> it's a hollywood spy thriller with as much oscar buzz as it has controversy. "zero dark thirty," the story of the hunt for osama bin laden, from the oscar-winning powerhouse team of katherine big ga lo and mark bo, recreates how it all happened from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the filmmakers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the filmmakers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take prot t protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our
. split between defense and domestic programs. a pentagon official says is he cautiously optimistic that the congress and the white house will come up with a deal to avoid the cliffs. one republic senator says he is more worried than ever. it's the top story at the bottom of the hour. mike emanuel is on it this evening. the idea was that these cuts would be so painful that this thing would be so horrible. that this would throw us into such a mess that there is no way these loons on capitol hill would let this happen. but lo and behold. >> exactly, shep. certainly 2012 campaign politics did not help congress and the white house find alternatives to these cuts. today a top republic senator told me time is running out. >> i'm more worried about the sequester now than ever because it seems to be overshadowed by discussions over going off the fiscal cliff which is a separate but related matter. a combination of those two things both huge tax increase and a $1.2 trillion in cuts will put us in a recession. defense and domestic cuts could be avoided if a grand bargain is struck to avoid th
'd refer you to the pentagon's comments this morning for details about this particular type of u.a.v., but again we have no evidence that the iranian claims are true. >> sreenivasan: a year ago, iran did manage to down a c.i.a. drone that apparently crossed the border from afghanistan. and last month, the u.s. military said another drone came under fire by iran over the persian gulf. it was undamaged. in afghanistan, a bomb blast has killed two nato troops in the country's south. the alliance says the attack happened yesterday. it did not provide the nationalities of those killed. so far this year at least 384 international troops have been killed in afghanistan. most of them have been americans. in economic news, the u.s. housing market showed more signs of recovery in a new report by the real estate data firm, core logic. it said home prices in october were up more than 6% compared with last year. that's the largest gain in more than six years. still, the housing news was not enough to boost wall street's spirits. stocks edged lower again as budget talks in washington showed no
ground operation would be necessary. the pentagon estimates it will take 25,000 troops to seize syria's chemical weapons stockpile. just ahead, general jack keane will join us live to discuss the implications of sending u.s. missiles to the board and why this cache' of chemical weapons requires such a response. >> more on the attack on our consulate in benghazi. james clapper walked house lawmakers through the details of the attack that ended with the death of ambassador chris stevens and three others. clapper trying to answer questions about president obama's handling of intel before, during and after the attack. tom rooney was in that briefing. welcome to the program. it's great to see you. did we learn anything? did the ball get advanced this morning? >> i got this briefing a few weeks ago as a member of the intelligence committee. date was open up for the rest of the house. i learned a lot. i learned we do not have adequate protection at our compound there in libya, benghazi. and if that's the case in other dangerous areas of the world, then we have got a lot of work to do at the
of rank. there's all sorts of money to be saved in the pentagon that will have no effect whatsoever on our defensive posture or our capability. >> but steve, i'm curious, though. what is the difference, in your opinion, between raising the top marginal rate and closing some loopholes? if you get $1.2 trillion in revenue, why does it matter so much more to the president that you do it by raising the top rate when the super wealthy, as we've described on the show, aren't going to be paying higher taxes? >> the issue is, joe, it's a question of whether it's going to be $800 billion or $1.2 trillion or somewhere in between. if the number ends up being $1.2 trillion, and we'll see where it comes out, it's hard to do it just with deductions. you end up limiting deductions so much that you cut into charities. you cut into state and local governments. you cut into a whole bunch of home mortgage. >> what about the buffett proposal? >> the buffett proposal is a great idea. the buffett proposal is a kind of no-brainer. >> how much does it raise? >> $160 billion over ten years. it's a piece of the puz
in the defense of the country out of the pentagon, and consolidate programs and save a significant amount of money. >> this weekend, talk with senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, the affordable care act, and the future of the republican party. the president has written several books and reports, including his latest, "the debt bomb." live sunday at the 12:00 noon eastern. >> no, we hear from a syrian opposition spokesman about the latest developments in the ongoing syrian civil war. the spokesman urged the international community to intervene, and calls for u.s. leadership, rather than just humanitarian aid. from johns hopkins, this is an hour and a half. >> thank you. thank you for everyone. thank you for the john hopkins university for organizing this event. let me start by sharing with you a personal story that just happened today, which gives you just a sense of how our lives became tragic. today, one of my close friends, a well-known activist in my home town, has been killed by indiscriminate shelling in the city. daria is 7 kilometers south of damascus. and it has been days o
're getting breaks news on syria. straight to our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, for new details here as we're talking about, you know, potential chemical weaponry. now not only talking about it, not only existing in syria, but the fact you're hearing from a u.s. official it is being nixed. tell me what you know. >> now we know what is going on. over the weekend, the u.s. got intelligence that syrian forces were beginning to start mixing chemical agents. essentially putting two chemicals together that would allow them to make deadly sarin gas. this is extremely serious news regarding the war in syria because until now there has not been that mixing together, the next step would be to put that deadly sarin into artillery shells. the u.s. believes, brooke, that the assad regime is looking at the possibility of some kind of limited chemical artillery strike on its own people, on rebel forces. officials tell us they hasten to add they don't believe assad -- bashar al assad has made the final decision to go ahead with a strike, but that that's what these preparations could be aimed towards
be military. >> cnn's pentagon correspondent barbara starr is live for me now. what i'm not hearing from the president or either from secretary clinton or tony blair is, you know, they talk about the if. what then? any possible scenarios, possible action, i'm not hearing concrete scenarios, are you? >> well, you're not, brooke. i think for a very good reason. they want to stop this before it gets to that. nobody wants to have to strike at syrian chemical weapons plants. if you think about it logically, it is a very tough target. you have to know exactly where it is. you have to strike that hard enough to virtually incinerate all the chemical or biological material there before it escapes into the atmosphere. if those chemical weapons started to go on the move, in artillery shells or bombs, could you chase them all down? and, of course, in syria, much of this material is located or co-located in neighborhoods and towns with civilian populations. so you're putting civilian populations at risk. i think that's why you're hearing the very tough language from washington to nato headquarters. e
of the country out of the pentagon and consolidate programs and save a significant amount of money. >> this weekend you can talk with oklahoma senator about the fiscal cliff and the future of the republican party. the senator has written several books and reports including his latest the debt bomb. join our conversation live sunday at noon eastern an c-span2. >> vice president biden shop t at the opening of the first costco warehouse in the nation's capitol. he also made remarks about the fiscal cliff and middle class tax cuts. >> i went to get my wife's card and she said no, you get your own. [inaudible conversation] >> i know what i am looking for. [inaudible conversation] >> vice-president, what are you shopping for? >> my wife is starting a thing called book buddies for women's shelters and daycare centers. i am buying a bunch of books for the book buddies back in delaware. >> how are you choosing your books? >> based on some things i know my grand kids like. will i come to that side? i'm going to come around that way. in this store.s in this storfos take 2200 books out of thei
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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